Learn to Invest in Beryllium

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Learn to Invest in Cerium

Cerium, like its neighboring element lanthanum, is a soft silvery metal that oxidizes quickly when exposed to air. Identified by the symbol Ce and the number 58 on the periodic chart, this metal was named after the dwarf planet Ceres which had been discovered in 1801.

Of all the rare earth elements, cerium is the most common. It is used in many applications both because it has been a reasonably priced element, and because it has so many uses.


Cerium in History

Cerium was first discovered in 1803 by three different chemists. The name given it by Jöns Jakob Berzelius is the one that stuck. It wasn't until the late 1830 that the first nearly pure
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Learn to Invest in Cesium

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Learn to Invest in Dysprosium

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Learn to Invest in Erbium

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Learn to Invest in Europium

As the name suggests the 63rd element in the periodic table was named after the continent of Europe. Europium is identified by the abbreviation Eu. It is recognizes as one of the heavy rare earth elements (HREE).

Europium is similar to lead in that it is easy to bend and shape. When exposed to high pressure at low temperatures, it becomes a superconductor. At other temperatures the superconductive properties of the metal are suppressed.

Europium, like most of the other lanthanide metals oxidizes when exposed to air. This forms a mustard yellow powder. Because of its high reactivity to air, it is stored in mineral oil. If temperatures reach 150 to 180oC, europium
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Learn to Invest in Gadolinium

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Learn to Invest in Gallium

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Learn to Invest in Germanium

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Learn to Invest in Hafnium

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Learn to Invest in Holmium

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Learn to Invest in Indium

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Learn to Invest in Lanthanum

Lanthanum is a metallic element that gives its name to a whole grouping of metals in the periodic table. The other metals with similar properties are known as lanthanides. Like all metals of the lanthanide group, lanthanum oxidizes readily when it is exposed to air. It comes in both stable and radioactive forms. This particular silvery white metal is identified by the symbol La on a periodic table and has been given the number of 57. The pure metal is soft and malleable, but only used in research, as it oxidizes so rapidly. A 1/3-inch sized cube (1 cm2) would disappear within a year.


Lanthanum in History

The Swedish chemist Carl Gustav Mosander discovered
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Learn to Invest in Lithium

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Learn to Invest in Lutetium

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Learn to Invest in Neodymium

The light rare earth mineral Neodymium is present in monazite and bastnäsite ores. Chemists assigned the abbreviation Nd to reflect this element in the periodic table and the number 60 to reflect its atomic weight. The term "rare earth" is a misnomer in this case, as this element is commonly distributed in the earth's crust.

The name comes from didymos, Greek for twin, and neos, meaning new. It was a new metal extracted from the twin metal, didymium. Like all other lanthanide metals, neodymium oxidizes easily. It combines with oxygen to form neodymium hydroxide. If dissolved in sulfur, it forms neodymium sulfide. And when combined with nitrogen, it forms neodymium nitride.
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Learn to Invest in Niobium

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Learn to Invest in Praseodymium

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Learn to Invest in Promethium

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Learn to Invest in Rubidium

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Learn to Invest in Samarium

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Learn to Invest in Scandium

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Learn to Invest in Tantalum

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Learn to Invest in Terbium

Terbium is one of the heavy rare earth elements (HREE). Its appearance when refined is exceptionally silvery white. It is never found naturally in nature, but always in combination with other rare earth elements, especially yttrium.

As an element, it appears in the periodic table as the 65th element, with the abbreviation Tb. This metal is so soft it can be cut with a table knife. It also has the property of being able to be drawn out in a thin wire without breaking.


Terbium in History

Terbium is named after the town where it was originally discovered in gadolinite deposits. It remained an unidentified compound when first extracted by Swedish chemist
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Learn to Invest in Thulium

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Learn to Invest in Ytterbium

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Learn to Invest in Yttrium

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Learn to Invest in Zirconium

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